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Please Donate to Relief Fund for Victims of Terrorism in Nigeria. CANAN is a 501c organization and your financial contributions are tax-deductible.

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Checks can also be written out to CANAN and mailed to our office at the mailing address below:

Christian Association of Nigerian-Americans, CANAN
P.O. Box 1041
Bay Shore, NY 11706
United States

Two CANAN Chapters Launched For California As Truce Talks With Boko Haram Yet To Yield Ceasefire

Cananusa.org----NY------Christian Association of Nigerian-Americans, CANAN has launched two chapters simultaneously in the West Coast, one in Los Angeles to cover the Southern section of the state and the others based in the capital of the State, Sacramento, up North.

Inaugurating the chapters Thursday October 23 in Los Angeles, CANAN President, Pastor (Dr.) James Fadele noted that Christians remain the main target of Boko Haram, and reminded Nigerian-American Christians that the horror of the terrorist group is not over yet.

Soon after the CANAN President spoke, a US-based international human rights group, Human Rights Watch, HRW, confirmed that Boko Haram attacks are mainly targeted against Christians.

According to a release by HRW on Monday October 27, 2014, “While Boko Haram has taken some victims arbitrarily, it seems to target students and Christians in particular.”

Read more: Two CANAN Chapters Launched For California As Truce Talks With Boko Haram Yet To Yield Ceasefire

Nigeria: Victims of Abductions Tell Their Stories



Read more: Nigeria: Victims of Abductions Tell Their Stories

Nigeria: Victims of Abductions Tell Their Stories

 

Horrific Abuses by Boko Haram, Lack of Government Protection

(London, October 27, 2014) – Women and girls abducted by the Islamist group Boko Haram are forced to marry, convert, and endure physical and psychological abuse, forced labor, and rape in captivity, Human Rights Watch said in a report released today. The group has abducted more than 500 women and girls since 2009, and intensified abductions since May 2013, when Nigeria imposed a state of emergency in areas where Boko Haram is most active.

The 63-page report, “‘Those Terrible Weeks in Their Camp’: Boko Haram Violence against Women and Girls in Northeast Nigeria,” is based on interviews with more than 46 witnesses and victims of Boko Haram abductions in Borno, Yobe, and Adamawa states, including with girls who escaped the April 2014 abduction of 276 girls from Chibok secondary school. Their statements suggest that the Nigerian government has failed to adequately protect women and girls from a myriad of abuses, provide them with effective support and mental health and medical care after captivity, ensure access to safe schools, or investigate and prosecute those responsible for the abuses.

Read more: Nigeria: Victims of Abductions Tell Their Stories

Boko Haram and the Ceasefire That Wasn’t

Well, that didn’t last long. The ceasefire between Boko Haram and the Nigerian government – announced on Thursday, with much fanfare, by government spokesmen – has already been broken. If, that is, it actually existed in the first place. A skeptical SIMON ALLISON considers Nigeria’s track record on this subject.

To understand what’s going on in north-eastern Nigeria, it is first necessary to pick your way through a maze of ambiguity, misinformation and misdirection; a dense fog of spin compounded by the fog of war that makes actual reporting there so difficult and so dangerous.

Neither Boko Haram nor the Nigerian government indulge in much straight talk. The foundation of Boko Haram’s public communications are long, violent videos that begin with a sermon and end in a messy public beheading, the irony of that juxtaposition lost on the wild-eyed fanatics who exhort supporters to more and bloodier killings in God’s name. Nonetheless, it is effective. Boko Haram, and especially the group’s leader Abubakar Shekau, are experts at turning acts of violence into media attention.

Read more: Boko Haram and the Ceasefire That Wasn’t

CANAN, Others Form Global Platform For Nigerian Terror Victims

HOPE is rising for victims of terror in Nigeria, as an international movement to cater for their advocacy and material needs has been formed in New York with membership from two United Nations agencies, top US-based Nigerians and the Christian Association of Nigerian-Americans (CANAN).

  US-based Nigerians of all shades and faiths came together with United

Nations Fund for Population Activities, UNFPA and United Nations

Development Programme (UNDP) to form a global platform to restore focus of the international community to the plight of Nigerian terror victims just as CANAN launched a $1m relief fund for the victims within the month.

Read more: CANAN, Others Form Global Platform For Nigerian Terror Victims

Peace talks split Boko Haram into two groups

Following the ceasefire deal the Federal Government entered into with Boko Haram, the violent fundamentalist sect has split into two. While one faction wants peace, the other doesn’t.

It was gathered on Sunday that the Federal Government might have entered into the ceasefire with the faction interested in the cessation of hostilities in the North-East.

A reliable source in government told The PUNCH in Abuja that the leaders of the pro-peace faction of the sect , were the ones who took part in the negotiations with representatives of the Chadian, Cameroonian and Federal Government in Ndjamena, Chad last week.

Federal Government and Boko Haram representatives are expected to fine tune the details of the ceasefire at another   meeting in Ndjamena on Tuesday.

Our source said he believed that the attacks on Shafa in Borno State and Sina, Adamawa State on Friday, could have been carried out by the faction not be interested in ending the violence.

Read more: Peace talks split Boko Haram into two groups

Ceasefire: Boko Haram to release 218 Chibok girls Monday

There are strong indications that the 218 schoolgirls abducted six months ago in Chibok, Borno State, by the violent Boko Haram sect may be released on Monday following a ceasefire agreement between the sect and the Federal Government.

The Federal Government, through the Nigerian military, had on Friday said that it had agreed to a ceasefire with the violent sect and that the Chibok girls would soon be released.

The deal was announced by the Chief of Defence Staff, Air Marshal Alex Badeh.

The military has struggled to defeat Boko Haram sect which began attack against Nigeria since 2009.

The Islamist militant group sparked global outrage six months ago by abducting more than 200 girls from the town of Chibok.

Badeh said, “A ceasefire agreement has been concluded between the Federal Government and the Jama’atu Ahlis Sunna Lidda’awati wal Jihad (Boko Haram).”

Read more: Ceasefire: Boko Haram to release 218 Chibok girls Monday

CANAN Goes To Los Angeles Oct 23

Dear pastors, leaders of the faith, and all Nigerian Christians:

 

The Christian Association of Nigerian-Americans, CANAN was formed Sept 2012 in New York by a group of Christian and professional leaders in the Nigerian community here in the US.

 

 Since then, a total of 14 chapters have now been launched in major US cities, and now we are establishing our first local chapter in the west coast, of the US to be based in Los Angeles, CA.

 

This chapter will serve the state and other willing locations in the region. It would be CANAN's 15th chapter, and more chapters are in the offing.

 

Please review details about CANAN and other local chapters on www.cananusa.org.

 

Details of the LA Chapter launching holding are as follows:

 

Date: OCT 23

Time: 5pm

Venue: WEST ANGELES CHURCH

3600 Crenshaw Blvd

Los Angeles, CA 90016

Ph: 562-882-9740 or 516 819 4355

 

Read more: CANAN Goes To Los Angeles Oct 23

CANAN Pledges $1 Million in Fight Against Boko Haram; Calls for Donations to Help Persecuted Christians in Nigeria

The Christian Association of Nigerian-Americans, CANAN, held its second annual fundraising dinner in New York City on Sunday where the organization's President vowed to raised $1 million within six months to help victims of terrorism in Nigeria.

In a powerful and heartfelt speech, Pastor James Fadele, Ph.D., acknowledged the rise in terrorism in Nigeria, particularly the growing threat of Islamic jihadist group Boko Haram, which advocates a strict form of sharia law.

Read more: CANAN Pledges $1 Million in Fight Against Boko Haram; Calls for Donations to Help Persecuted...

Come And Bomb Boko Haram, Prof. Babatunde Osotimehin Urges Coalition Fighting ISIS

The executive director of the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), Prof. Babatunde Osotimehin called on the US-led coalition of nations fighting ISIS in Syria and Iraq to extend their force of arms to Boko Haram fighters in Northern Nigeria. He made the call at the Christian Association of Nigerian-Americans (CANAN)’s annual dinner held yesterday at Hilton Hotel in New York City.

Professor Osotimehin’s UNFPA is one of the vast group of organizations that have come together to form a global platform aimed at focusing the world’s attention to

Read more: Come And Bomb Boko Haram, Prof. Babatunde Osotimehin Urges Coalition Fighting ISIS

More Articles...

  1. Boko Haram fighters 'surrender' as alleged chief killed
  2. DHQ confirms Shekau dead, search for Chibok girls ongoing
  3. Boko Haram expanding from Nigeria to Cameroon
  4. New York Chapter Leaders Inaugurated As Plans For Oct 5 Charity Dinner Intensifies

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